Are the remains of Theia, the impactor that created the Moon, buried deep within the Earth?

The continental sized provinces at the base of the mantle were recently proposed to the remnants of Theia, the protoplanet that struck the Earth to form the Moon 4.5 billion years ago. But are other explanations for these provinces possible? See the discussion in Science.

Are the remains of Theia, the impactor that created the Moon, buried deep within the Earth?2021-08-14T00:37:07-07:00

Continents of the underworld come into focus

Research by our group about the nature of the deep Earth, led by Dr. Curtis Williams, was recently featured in the Atlantic Magazine.

Continents of the underworld come into focus2021-08-14T00:36:46-07:00

Celebrating 150 Years of the Periodic Table

In celebration of 150 years of Mendeleev's periodic table, I did a short fun little youtube video that you can check out from this UC Davis website.

Celebrating 150 Years of the Periodic Table2021-08-14T00:37:30-07:00

Gigantic masses in the Earth’s mantle have existed for more than 4 billion years.

Research about the antiquity of the continental sized large low shear wave velocity provinces at the core-mantle boundary was published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: Primitive helium is sourced from seismically slow regions in the lowermost mantle by Curtis Williams, Sujoy Mukhopadhyay, Maxwell Rudolph and Barbara Romanowicz, and was featured in GeoSpace.

Gigantic masses in the Earth’s mantle have existed for more than 4 billion years.2021-08-14T00:38:05-07:00

Mantle neon illuminates Earth’s formation

Our new paper is out today in Nature: Capture of nebular gases during Earth's accretion is preserved in deep-mantle neon by Curtis Williams and Sujoy Mukhopadhyay. To read some examples of press reports check out the UC Davis press release, Cosmos Magazine or the Daily Mail.

Mantle neon illuminates Earth’s formation2021-08-22T18:50:59-07:00

Mantle Xenon has a story to tell about the history of volatile cycling

A new paper detailing how xenon isotopes remember the history of volatile recycling is out today in Nature: Xenon isotopic constraints on the history of volatile recycling into the mantle by Rita Parai and Sujoy Mukhopadhyay. See some perspectives of the paper in the UC Davis press release and Physics Today

Mantle Xenon has a story to tell about the history of volatile cycling2021-08-22T18:51:42-07:00

Earth remembers accretion

Our new paper is out today in Science: Preservation of Earth-forming events in the tungsten isotopic composition of modern flood basalts by Hanika Rizo et al. W anomalies in the mantle demonstrate that the Earth has not erased signatures from the main stage of planet formation. Also see the Perspective by Tais Dahl.

Earth remembers accretion2021-08-14T00:46:54-07:00

Challenging ideas of deep Earth’s behavior and formation

Check out our paper in Nature on Early differentiation and volatile accretion recorded in deep-mantle neon and xenon. The paper presents evidence that the plume and MORB sources had differentiated within the first 100 million years and has not been homogenized since. This results provides new insights into the Earth's early history, volatile accretion, mantle [...]

Challenging ideas of deep Earth’s behavior and formation2021-08-14T01:26:10-07:00
Go to Top